The Atomic Secrets of Flash Comics #3, up for auction

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Flash co-creator garden fox was well known for his attention to detail throughout his long career. “Knowledge is a kind of hobby for me”, he once said, adding that “anything related to science, nature or unusual facts, I can consult my files or the at least 2 000 books I have.” Along with this, the start of World War II had a strong early influence on the character, as it did on the entire American comic book industry of the time. Fox’s trademark style made The Flash a unique blend of science, fantasy, and its moment in time, especially in its early issues – and Flash Comics #3 is an excellent example of this mixture of influences. Although this issue has a cover featuring the character Cliff Cornwall rather than Flash or Hawkman, it makes for a more approachable early example of this important series. There is a Flash Comics #3 (DC, 1940) CGC VG/FN 5.0 Off-White to White Pages Auctioned This Week February 20-21, 2022 Sunday & Monday Comic Books Select auction #122208 at Heritage Auctions.

Flash Comics #3 (DC, 1940)

From the first issue, Flash was heavily influenced by the science of its time. And as other clues from the golden age issues of Flash comics, the “hard water” that gave Flash his power was certainly inspired by heavy water – a form of water with a unique atomic structure and properties useful for the production of nuclear weapons and nuclear energy. . The substance was first isolated by a UC Berkeley chemist in 1933, which likely gave rise to this part of Jay Garrick’s backstory. Heavy water was popularly (and wildly) supposed to have a wide range of effects on living beings at the time Comic Flash #1 was written in 1939 – including newspaper headlines claiming “Heavy Water Can Accelerate Human Life”. Considering this, combined with its actual use in nuclear processes, it was just a giant leap forward for the scientific mind. garden fox to turn such inspirations into lightning-fast abilities after Jay Garrick’s accident at Midwestern University.

These influences continued throughout the early issues of the series. By number 3, for example, the plot hangs on secret uranium neutron bombardment plans. Again, this was influenced by the scientific breakthroughs announced and discussed for their military applications even as this issue was probably being written. There’s even a clever historical reference from Fox made in passing in the story, to the Great Blizzard of 1888, one of the worst blizzards in American history that dumped 55 inches of snow on the East Coast that winter. , and which was still widely remembered and discussed in the 1930s. An excellent first issue of a historically significant comic series, there is a Flash Comics #3 (DC, 1940) CGC VG/FN 5.0 Off-White to White Pages Auctioned This Week February 20-21, 2022 Sunday & Monday Comic Books Select auction #122208 at Heritage Auctions.

Flash Comics #3 (DC, 1940)
Flash Comics #3 (DC, 1940)

Flash Comics #3 (DC, 1940) CGC VG/FN 5.0 Off-white to white pages. King Standish’s run begins with his first appearance here. EE Hibbard’s art on the Flash begins. Cover and illustrations by Sheldon Moldoff. Overstreet 2021 VG 4.0 value = $962; Value FN 6.0 = $1,443. CGC 2/22 Census: 2 out of 5.0, 6 more.

View certification for CGC Certification ID 1165382005 and purchase evaluator notes if available.

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Posted in: Comics, Sponsored by Heritage, Vintage Paper | Tagged: dc comics, flash, golden age

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Lucas E. Kelly